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Partitura I Was Born To Love You

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Partitura I Was Born To Love You

 

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It is nice to see that you

It is nice to see that you acknowledge that it does in fact NOT simulate altitude training (users need to use bucketfuls of faith to actually believe something so illogical).But I am skeptical to it having any beneficial effects at all. You believe in it and have good experiences using it. I am skeptical and may not like it at all if I try it. Placebo and nocebo effect can be at play. My experience really is meaningless, what matters is if it works or not and it does not make much sense from a physical standpoint. I don't see why strengthening lung muscles should help your cardio, when my body is bursting with lactic acid being able to continue to huff and puff is not any of my problems.If you use it a lot I guess it could change your breathing pattern, that seems possible... What I do know though is that it is being aggressively marketed as a substitute for altitude training which is a bad case of false advertising.

Training at attitude elicits

Training at attitude elicits a physiological response of the body releasing more red blood cells and increase the production cycle..this is due to the level of oxygen concentration. Below four thousand feet oxygen contcentration is roughly 20%. And stays constant because constant due to hemoglobin. Unless you suffer from blood loss...it's pretty much constant. After that 4k it bell curves downwards rather quickly per 1000 feet. Hence the term thin air.So I guess the real question is can you train for this?Yes... But.....1- to maintain the ability to function in a hypoxia state is largely stay in a thin air environment. Achieved by 1- living at attitude for awhile. Aka acclimatization. Move to any where in Colorado, Mexico city or lake Tahoe2- using a altitude tent.... Basically is a sleeping bubble that is sealed off and filled with low percentage oxygen. Forcing the body to release more red blood cells. Takes about 3 weeks to acclimate but it must be done nightly.If one stops and you are not at altitude .... In roughly 10 days, the corrects itself and readjusts to the 20 percent mark.Can it be done indefinitely ?Yes... Expensively, you own a altitude simulatutorCheaply. Move to a height of 4k feet plus.Covertly , Yes... Blood doping, Epo supplementation Both work but have hand in hand health risks that lie on morbid side.Using a mask? In theory yes ... Reduce the volume of air pumped in to the lung but increase the demand of oxygen ... The body releases some more blood volume by reducing flow to other unnecessary body parts- tempoarily.Reality...Once you take off that mask.... It tilts back in to balance.Oxygen level in the air at less than 4k... Will still be 20percent. Your body hasn't released enough natural occurring epo to impact anything. Meaning no lasting effects.There is a reason why the us Olympic training centre is in colorado

Looks like you're going to

Looks like you're going to invade a house SWAT Style on a meth lab or something. Still a nice find OP. I think it's a great idea, but if I was someone using that at my gym, they better ALREADY be in sick physical condition or else it would just look dumb. There was a guy that most people could out cardio that wanted to try the snorkel thing and everyone laughed and said "shut up, you have trouble running 5m's."

The Fatal Flaws of Altitude

The Fatal Flaws of Altitude Masks for Endurance Athletes

The short answer to the question of whether you should invest in an altitude training mask is: No. But, as with so many things in sports science, there’s more to the story because there can be benefits to exercising in a hypoxic environment, they’re just not the ones you normally associate with altitude training. First, here’s why you don’t need the mask:
Restricting your breathing ruins your workout

As an endurance athlete your goal is to maximize your ability to deliver oxygen to working muscles. The more oxygen you can inhale and deliver per minute, the more muscular work you can perform. When you restrict your breathing with a mask, you lose power and go slower. You’re stressing your ability to breathe, not your ability to do work. To improve fitness for endurance sports you need to accumulate enough workload to create a training stimulus, and you can’t work as hard when your breathing is restricted. Ironically, the mask makes your workout difficult and exhausting, but ultimately less effective.
Strengthening breathing muscles doesn’t improve athletic performance

Breathing against resistance in training doesn’t result in an increase in the amount of oxygen you can take in per minute when you remove the resistance. In other words, the strength of your intercostal muscles and diaphragm aren’t limiting factors in your ability to fill your lungs. When people report feeling like they can breathe deeper, it is likely because breathing deeply or forcefully has helped the muscles loosen up and increased the mobility of your ribs. You’ll notice the same thing if you have to take a few weeks off from exercise; after a workout or two you feel like you can take bigger breaths because your chest has loosened up.
Even elite athletes at altitude don’t want to train at altitude

Athletes who live at altitude acclimate to the elevation by developing more red blood cells. That means they can train effectively at that altitude, but their power still declines when they go up into the mountains outside of town. The bigger benefit to living at altitude is the ability to go down to lower elevations for training camps where elite athletes can take advantage of increased oxygen carrying capacity in an environment where there’s more oxygen. They don’t do the opposite. They don’t live at 6,000 feet and go up to the top of mountain at 12,000 feet to do their intervals. In specialized cases we also employ supplemental oxygen training for athletes living and training at altitude. The High Altitude Training Center (HATC) at the Olympic Training Center is more often used to simulate sea level conditions than high altitude conditions. By adding oxygen athletes can achieve sea level power outputs in training, or recover in sea level conditions, while living at altitude.
Even if the idea was good, the exposure is too short

Part of the reason the traditional “Live High, Train Low” method of altitude training says “live high” is because the phrase indicates how much time you need to be exposed to altitude for it to yield a positive training adaptation. Restricting oxygen for the short duration of a workout isn’t enough of a stimulus to lead to the training adaptations you’re after from altitude.

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