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Ally McBeal - Series of the 90s

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Ally McBeal - Series of the 90s

 

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Is a comedy-drama tv series created by David E. Kelley which aired on the Fox network from September 8, 1997 to May 20, 2002 for 112 episodes of 45-48 minutes each and 5 seasons.

The series was focused on Ally McBeal (Calista Flockhart) a young lawyer working in the fictional Boston law firm Cage and Fish with other young lawyers whose lives and loves were eccentric, humorous and dramatic.

Ally McBeal initially went to law school while following the love of her life, attending Harvard Law School with Billy Thomas (Gil Bellows), with whom she had had a relationship since they were eight years old. Billy, however, left Harvard to go to University of Michigan Law School, breaking Ally's heart.

After the breakup, and an unsuccessful stint at her first job as a lawyer, she ended up at her new job where coincidentally, her missing ex boyfriend Billy had also found employment. However things were not that simple, and Billy was now married, setting up a situation where all kinds of crazy sparks were sure to fly. This was compounded by Ally’s vivid imagination that would manifest in the form of a fantasy world accessible to viewers but invisible to anyone in her immediate surroundings.

The show was single, quirky and empowered, Ally dressed the part of a fashion plate and led a powerful ensemble cast of equally offbeat friends, including seemingly unbeatable lawyer John Cage (Peter MacNicol).

Despite the show attracted its share of criticism from women’s groups who felt that the main character merely represented the idea of independence and that the program frequently portrayed its female characters as weak, needy and in search of a man to fix all of their problems; in many aspects it still was ground breaking, allowing writers to treat reality with a little less respect than was previously allowed, ushering in the freedom that would allow for the success of less ambitious comedies to come in the decade that followed.

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